France will abolish state funding for homeopathic medicines, saying they are no better than & # 039; placebo & # 039;

Jul 11, 2019 | | Say something

France will complete the financing of homeopathic remedies through its state health system after 2021, after the government acknowledged that the remedies are no better than a placebo.

It could be a blow to the alternative remedies in the country, which are often sold in pharmacies along with evidence-supported medicines and prescribed by doctors.

According to official figures, French social security payments for homeopathic remedies exceeded 126.8 million euros (114 million pounds), despite being 99.9999999999 percent water.

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A negative report published in March by the French Academy of Medicine and the Pharmacy Academy said that no health insurance should reimburse treatments and that no university should offer a homeopathy degree.

"I decided to start the process so as not to reimburse it completely," said French Health Minister Agnes Buzyn. Le Paisien Newspaper.

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38/47 Jugar Tetris en el hospital después de un incidente traumático podría prevenir el TEPT

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An injectable contraceptive gel that acts as a ‘reversible vasectomy’ is a step closer to being offered to men following successful trials on monkeys.
Vasalgel is injected into the vas deferens, the small duct between the testicles and the urethra. It has so far been found to prevent 100 per cent of conceptions

Vasalgel

42/47 Shift work and heavy lifting may reduce women’s fertility, study finds

Women who work at night or do irregular shifts may experience a decline in fertility, a new study has found.
Shift and night workers had fewer eggs capable of developing into healthy embryos than those who work regular daytime hours, according to researchers at Harvard University

Getty

43/47 Japanese government tells people to stop overworking

The Japanese government has announced measures to limit the amount of overtime employees can do – in an attempt to stop people literally working themselves to death.

A fifth of Japan’s workforce are at risk of death by overwork, known as karoshi, as they work more than 80 hours of overtime each month, according to a government survey.

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44/47 High blood pressure may protect over 80s from dementia

It is well known that high blood pressure is a risk factor for dementia, so the results of a new study from the University of California, Irvine, are quite surprising. The researchers found that people who developed high blood pressure between the ages of 80-89 are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease (the most common form of dementia) over the next three years than people of the same age with normal blood pressure.

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45/47 'Universal cancer vaccine’ breakthrough claimed by experts

Scientists have taken a “very positive step” towards creating a universal vaccine against cancer that makes the body’s immune system attack tumours as if they were a virus, experts have said. Writing in Nature, an international team of researchers described how they had taken pieces of cancer’s genetic RNA code, put them into tiny nanoparticles of fat and then injected the mixture into the bloodstreams of three patients in the advanced stages of the disease. The patients' immune systems responded by producing "killer" T-cells designed to attack cancer. The vaccine was also found to be effective in fighting “aggressively growing” tumours in mice, according to researchers, who were led by Professor Ugur Sahin from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany

Rex

46/47 Research shows that diabetes drug can be used to stop first signs of Parkinson’s

Scientists in a new study show that the first signs of Parkinson’s can be stopped. The UCL study is still in its research period but the team are ‘excited’. Today’s Parkinson’s drugs manage the symptoms of the disease but ultimately do not stop its progression in the brain.

PA

47/47 Drinking alcohol could reduce risk of diabetes

A new study shows that drinking alcohol three to four days a week could reduce the risk of diabetes. Wine was found to be most effective in reducing the risk due to the chemical compounds that balance blood sugar levels.

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Ms Buzyn, a former doctor, had said the country’s reputation was on the line after its National Authority for Health concluded in June that homeopathy “demonstrated sufficient effectiveness to justify a reimbursement.”

Currently social security reimburses up to 30 per cent of a patients outlay on homeopathic remedies, this will be cut to 15 per cent in 2020 and to zero by 2021.

While much less common, pockets of the NHS funding homeopathy in the UK have been pressured to end the practice in the past two years.

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NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens has said the practice is a “misuse of scare funds” and no better than sugar pills.

Homeopathic remedies take a substance thought to be causing the disease, such as grass pollen for hay fever, then dilute it repeatedly in water as this is believed to increase its power.

Preparations specify the agent is diluted to 10 parts per billion parts of water, so many remedies contain nothing but water.

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